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Hi there, I am a graphic- & interactive designer based in Germany. If I'm not behind the screen you will find me on the move. Have fun going through a comprehensive mood about my life.

Artique by Vincent Munier

This is such amazing piece of art. Not matter if still or moving, Photographer Vincent Munier’s work is pure art in perfection. The colours, composition and object melts into one great artwork. The story itself, the adventure and effort how he get to these places would be almost enough to show and tell. Munier seems to like the coldness of the Artic. He likes pulling heavy sleds, walking on skis across hundreds of miles on the territories of the white wolves.

In his book “Artique”, he showcases his best pictures from polar winter expeditions he did, generally alone, from over the past 6 years. His unique pictures carry us along into the white Arctic dessert, a world so different, so remote.

Between Places

Interesting documentary of the outdoor brand Peak Performance about climbing and sailing in Greenland. Often on those expeditions, athletes enter remote territory of unknown land and expectations. Different to many adventures, sailing and climbing in these areas have not been explored much. Artic mountaineering requires dedication into topographical research. Some information taken from the film description.

 From the start of the film, each scene seamlessly echoes back and forth between images of the surreal mountains in Greenland. The climbers are older, wiser and more reflected of their past adventures. Edurne, fresh off her incredible feat of being the first woman to climb all fourteen 8000 meter peaks in the world, tells us of her life story, while Erwan and Martial seek out new first ascents along the coastline, climbing, mountaineering and ski touring. Their story comes to life with archival footage of past hardships and hand drawn animations. Each of the climbers story flow in-and-out of this voyage through the fjords in this magic land.

Citadel Mountain Film Trailer

Promising and stunning new mountain film for 2015 from multi-award winner Alastair Lee and the Posing Productions crew; ‘Citadel’. Featuring hardcore UK alpinists Matt Helliker and Jon Bracey as they attempt the stunning NW ridge of the remote peak ‘The Citadel’ deep in the Neacola range, Alaska. The world’s first mountain film shot entirely in 4k, a stunning visual treat reveals alpine climbing like never before.

Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015

  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015
  • Winter Ascent Alpspitze 2015

My first winter ascent at Alpspitze 2.650m. Over the last 2 years I’ve climbed this beautiful mountain in 3 seasons. First in springtime when the top was still wrapped in snow. Second in summer but in bad weather. Constant rain and clouds destroyed any visibility. That was maybe, beside the winter ascent, the most dangerous climb as it was very slippery. Another time was late summer almost autumn, a nice climb with great visibility.

So it was time to do a winter ascent, a last ascent to close the book of this alpine route. Alpspitze is not the most difficult or technically climb but to be taken seriously. Still for me one of the most beautiful climbs when you look at the shape of the mountain and the stunning views. That’s exactly what it is, a rewarding feeling you take away from the mountain.

With it’s 2650m the mountain usually sink in snow during winter, which can be a good or bad thing. Some people climb up on ice axe and crampons over the north ridge and ski down over the east ridge. Or they climb up the east ridge and ski the same down. It deepens on the snow. North ridge is more challenging and for sure the better climb. With touring skis you would most probably choose an ascent via the east ridge.

As snow was still low at the end of this December 2015, a good weather window opened for a couple of days, we thought that this is the perfect chance for the winter ascent. So we packed our climbing gear, some warm cloth and went to Garmisch Partenkirchen to organised the rest of the needed equipment for a winter ascent. As we weren’t sure about the snow conditions on top, we brought ice axes and crampons with us to be prepared if needed. It showed up that it was the right decision we made.

The day started early with a quick breakfast before we jumped on the cable railway up to Osterfelderkopf (2065m). From here we followed the trail direction Alpspitze. A beautiful walk touched by the first sunlight of the day. It was fresh but not too cold. We expected low-low minus temperature but with the early sunlight it felt fine. We didn’t decide on the climb until we reached the last junction. Here we had to drop the coin and decide if we move left and ascent over the east ridge or do the ferrata climb over the north ridge. I thought the east ridge would be the safer version but was proofed wrong later. With the positive weather forecast and full of energy we decided on the ascent over the north ridge.

I was surprised about the good snow conditions up there. The via ferrata was almost free of ice and snow. Still, there was enough snow on the mountain but with the amount of respect and concentration, still feasible to do. With every meter of altitude we gained, sunlight and visibility increased and we got fully rewarded with some stunning views over Garmisch and towards Zugspitze following the Jubiläumsgrat. As we haven’t been sure about the descent and the conditions at the east ridge, how much snow there was still waiting for us, we really pushed our bodies to the top of the mountain. We wanted to at least have a safety window left if conditions turned out bad for us. Around lunch, approx. 3 hours after we entered the climb, we finally reached the summit. It is always such great feeling being on the top of Alpspitze and get rewarded with such an amazing view. Now in winter the air is so clear and fresh that it really made a big difference to summer. We had a short break, something to eat – for us and the birds. Some climber recommended us to not descent over the east ridge, as he heard the tunnel system was closed. Blocked through snow and not feasible for access. Instead of following pour plan he recommended to descent over the north ridge, the way we climbed up. Personally I’m not a big fan descending over the same way we ascended, and specially in our case the north ridge. On the other side, if the guy was right and you find out in front of the tunnel, it means you’re in trouble. The tunnel system is on the north-east side of the mountain and the exit and somehow connection to the mountain hut at Osterfelderkopf. Most probably, if you can’t access the tunnel and don’t carry a long rope in your bagpack, it means you have to turn around. That way back can stretch your descent for another couple of hours as you have to go down direction Bernadeinkopf I guess. But I’m not sure as I always been lucky to not enter that situation. So, again not this time.

Never change a running system! We still followed our plan and went down the east ridge – as it was planed. I didn’t believe, that with the low amount of snow we had this year, the tunnel was blocked. But I must admit I was quite nervous until we arrived at the tunnel system a couple of hours later. We lost quite some time climbing down the ridge with our ice axes and crampons as we always stepped on ice plates or into deep snow fields, which made the descent quite exciting and in the same time exhausting. Even that the ridge is not vertical, but with its 60° it seems a bit steep, definitely with snow and ice. We both been happy when we arrived at the bottom of the ridge and didn’t slip down that peak.

Here is a pic I found on the web, which shows the east ridge of Alpspitze. I marked the approx. descent we did for better understanding.

From here we had to cross the entire east side of the mountain to exit through the tunnel system. From the bottom of the east ridge we had to climb down first and later up, to enter a route along the hill side, which allowed us to follow for the next hours. What was usually part of the via ferrata in summer was now covered in snow and not accessible. The missing snow of the north ridge was waiting for us on the east ridge and along the east mountain side. So probably the guy’s advice was correct and the tunnel system was blocked. But at this time it was too late. When we made the decision to descent over the east ridge we had to take the risk of being blocked at the tunnel. For the next 1.5 hours we’ve been happy again to bring the ice axes and crampons with us. From a distance I spotted the entrance of the first tunnel and when we climbed down and realised it was accessible – some pressure released from my body. We switched on our headlamps and entered the tunnel system. The first one seemed to be the longest as it goes around some corners and it takes time until sunlight enters from the backside. Some more pressure fell off when sunlight hit the light of my headlamp. But that was only half of the rent. Another tunnel needed to be accessible to reach the way back to Osterfelderkopf. Also the second tunnel allowed us to enter and leave but right after the exit, the way was blocked with snow and ice – not accessible. We somehow managed to climb along the mountain and over that block of snow and ice to finally get back to Osterfelderkopf and the cable railway for our way down.

Overall it was an exhausting and challenging climb over 6 hours+ and fully rewarded. The stunning views, the amazing weather and the fun we had was definitely worth it. I’m glad everything went well, none of us slipped or got hurt. It’s for sure an recommendation for any alpinist and within the right weather & company every second worth it.

I’m sorry for the low outcome of photos, most pics are taken from film material I shot on GoPro, which I will use later for video. In the vast majority of risky situations, I’ve concentrate keeping my hands on safety tools instead of my camera. Keeping fingers crossed for the video material of this nice adventure.

Click READ MORE to see more pics if you haven’t seen the slideshow above.

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Your DNA design

What’s the color of your DNA? The designer Iona Inglesby started Dot One, a startup in 2015, which focuses on clothing and posters created by customers color of their DNA.

The DNA test is similar to a paternity test. Through a customized and specially developed algorithm colors are linked to the DNA code.

It’s a great idea and I believe very special for many customers. But as great the idea is as expensive it is. A poster costs approx. 200 Euro and a scarf around 420 Euro.

 

The art of stock-footage

image

Good stock footage is hard to find and can drive creatives mad. You’re left with either bad quality low-res footage, cheesy pictures or images out of budget for the project you’re working on. But there is hope beside the usual known sides like Getty- Images, Corbis or iStock etc …

Here are some recommendations for good stock footage ready for download and usage in high-ress.

 

The Christmas Story

The christmas story. We all know the famous and so often told story from our childhood. We tell it to our children and they will hopefully tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation. This version of the christmas story, done by Publicis Pixelpark from Hamburg, is a great creative example of how to tell the story in today’s situation. Beside the movie and a webpage, a printed version of the movie can get ordered through Amazon.

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER

“Well, I suppose nothing is meant to last forever. We have to make room for other people. It’s a wheel. You get on, you have to go to the end. And then somebody has the same opportunity to go to the end and so on.” – Vivian Maier

The secret life of unknown street photographer Viavian Maier. Vivian Maier, born in 1926 in the U.S., spend most of her youth in France. In 1951 she returned to the U.S. where she took up work as an nanny and care-giver for the rest of her life. In her leisure however, she had begun to venture into the art of photography. Consistently taking photos over the course of five decades, she would ultimately leave over 100,000 negatives, most of them shot in Chicago and New York City. Vivian would further indulge in her passionate devotion to documenting the world around her through homemade films, recordings and collections, assembling one of the most fascinating windows into American life in the second half of the twentieth century.

Finding Vivian Maier is the critically acclaimed documentary about this mysterious nanny, who secretly took those photographs that were hidden in storage lockers. She never showed or told anybody about her work.

Her massive body of work would come to light when in 2007 her work was discovered at a local thrift auction house on Chicago’s Northwest Side. From there, it would eventually impact the world over and change the life of the man who championed her work and brought it to the public eye, John Maloof.

Currently, Vivian Maier’s body of work is being archived and cataloged for the enjoyment of others and for future generations. John Maloof is at the core of this project after reconstructing most of the archive, having been previously dispersed to the various buyers attending that auction. Now, with roughly 90% of her archive reconstructed, Vivian’s work is part of a renaissance in interest in the art of Street Photography.

 

Life on the Rails

  • Life on the Rails
  • Life on the Rails
  • Life on the Rails

Train hopping is nothing new and it’s done by people since the first train ride. But lately it increase in popularity and becomes almost a trend by young people. Through Facebook & Co it finds it’s way into the backpacking community. Over a period of 10 years, Mike Brodie, a young 18 year old who escaped from home in 2003, shot documentary style pictures during his train hopping activities through the US. He just releases a book under the title “A Period of Juvenile Prosperity“, which showcases his journey over the years. Train hopping is quite dangerous as jumping on & off a moving train isn’t easy. Many train hoppers get killed over time. Take a look at his website with some of his best shots. It’s defiantly worth it! Jump on now!

 

This is another great documentary from Vice magazine about the Hobo tradition.

Shoots on a 350ft Cliff

  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff
  • Shoots on a 350ft Cliff

People must be quite in love with heights when they ask Photographer Jay Philbrick to take pictures of them onto the face of a cliff, 350 feet above the ground. Philbrick started his career as a professional mountain guide before picking up a camera and starting a photography business. He takes his clients to Echo Lake State Park in New Hampshire, where the 700-foot Cathedral Ledge looms over the lake. With climbing gear, he carefully lowers his subjects onto a small outcropping on the face of the cliff, about 350 feet up.

So if you up for some real different wedding shots, per- or post wedding shoot, get in contact with him. Find more images here.

Duet – Do more

Nice App for designers, which turns your iPad into a second screen. Nowadays as a freelance designer work is found in many different offices & locations. To have a second screen at home is nice and within the complexity of most graphic– & multimedia software a must have, but whats happen when working somewhere else?  A quick and handy solution comes with the Duet App. You can easily connect your iPAd via W-Lan or wire to your powerbook and thats it. Built by ex-Apple engineers, Duet delivers a Retina Display at 60 frames per second, with absolutely no lag. Take a look and download it from here – Duet Website

Best of Web 2015

2015 is coming to an end and clips start rolling out with the best of web 2015 footage. I must admit I love those look-backs with scenes of crazy people leaving their comfort zones, stunning tricks & creative ideas. The quality of those look-backs is often a problem as many of the short clips have lack of resolution etc. The above one is not only amazing in terms of content but also in terms of image quality. Have fun watching the full-length 20 min movie.

TUNING SESSION!

SSD

Apples give’s you that amazing feeling when you hold a new piece of modern hardware in your hands. You walk out of the Apple store and believe that this device is the fastest and most advance technology on planet earth. You think this will last for the upcoming 5-8 years and is still good enough for most of what you bought it for.

WRONG. I’m in the 4th loop of Macintosh Computer. I say Macintosh because when I bought the first Apple Macintosh we still called them like this. It was the first Powermac in new design & concept. The Apple Macintosh Powermac 3G. 1999 one of the fastest machine on the market and with it’s 1GB RAM, 300MB Processor and a 4 GB Hard Drive, I was more proud about this Powermac than my other loved machine, a 1971 Ford Taunus. Different to the Taunus, 2 years later the first iPod was launched and had more power and disc space than my Powermac, commonly known as the “Blue and White G3”. Lucky me, at the time I already finished university and had applied for a job at Leo Burnett. There I had the great fortune of a company computer, the new “Powerbook G4 Titanium”, another state-of-the-art product, which was carefully designed by Apple. At the time the fastest and most advanced Powerbook to order. To cut a long story short, the same loop happened over and over again, every time you get a new Apple product you have this special feeling, until 2 years are gone and you think you are so “old school” with your computer that you would love to take it to a Apple museum or start your own one.

 I bought my latest Powerbook in 2012 and yes, I had the same known uplifting feeling when I unpacked it. 2 years later I worked on a Powerbook with a SSD Drive for the first time. This changed my entire feeling. I didn’t thought I’ve been thrown backwards for 2 years with my computer, it felt more than a time warp. But at the start of SSD drives I found costs of them too high. Now, after another 2 years, costs went down and sizes of SSD drives up. That was enough reason for me to take my 2012 Powerbook with 8 GB RAM and a 500 GB HD, to replace it with a 1 TB SSD drive, the Samsung SSD 850 EVO. I didn’t change the DVD drive with the old 500GB HD, but take it into consideration to replace it. The result is amazing already. Where it took almost 2 min to start my Powerbook before, it takes now 1 min. Applications like Photoshop or other CC programs open almost on click. I haven’t done any rendering on film or 3D but I think this is more based on RAM than hard drive. But the entire operation system is so much faster that it feels like I’ve just been thrown 2 years ahead into the future. [/one_half_last]

Refold

Most designers or creatives will know the feeling of sitting many endless hours in front of their screens. The feeling in their back when they get up or the next morning after a long night at work. We all wish to have one of the fancy standing/sit desk. A research by British academics found out that standing is same worse for you than sitting. So a standing desk is maybe not the best fix for the problem. But I just came across this nice standing table, made from cardboard table, which is flexible, foldable, portable, affordable & 100% recyclable. It’s a nice idea and I’m sure it’s a great tool to carry around with you to different working spaces. With the costs starting at 250 $, the investment is pretty high and for me only accaptable due to the fact that it can get easily carried around. Other than that I would maybe prefer a stand/sit work station at home. If you are interested in getting one – more information here.